Aims:
  • The project aimed to address three key research questions in a rigorous and policy relevant manner. The research questions addressed were:
  • How and in what ways does utilization of allied health services differ among patients with chronic disease and what is the relationship to type of health insurance coverage?
  • How and in what ways does utilization of allied health services by patients with chronic disease differ before and after the introduction of the Chronic Disease Management items?
  • For women with chronic disease, how and in what ways does utilization of allied health services change over time with different life stages and what is the relationship to health insurance coverage?
Policy Impact:
  • This project made important contributions to understanding how allied health service policy changes have affected use of allied health services. For example, following the introduction of the CDM items, use of allied health services by people with diabe
  • Apparent inequities in allied health service are an important finding of this project, and warrant policy consideration.

Use of Allied Health Services

With the global burden of disease, building the evidence base for the use of health services and what influences patterns of use is of critical policy importance. The emphasis on multidisciplinary care for people with chronic disease has stimulated interest in the use of allied health services by patients with chronic disease. The Chronic Disease Management (CDM) items introduced in 2005 provide Medicare rebates for individual allied health services to enable better access for patients with chronic disease. In this study, analyses of data from the National Health Survey (NHS) and Australian Longitudinal Study of Women’s Health (ALSWH), and a systematic review, were used to examine patterns of allied health service use, and how use might differ among people with chronic disease and different types of health insurance.

Key findings from the research showed that inequalities in use of allied health services exist for sex (men are less likely to access services than women, in particular after retirement), English language proficiency, and possession of ancillary insurance. Insurance is of greatest importance for people in good health, with a smaller but still notable effect on access to services for those in poor health. The systematic review further showed that the effect of insurance is conditional on a range of other factors such as patient and provider attitudes and beliefs, features of the insurance product/provider and institutional and delivery system features.

The research was funded by the Australian Primary Health Care Research Institute (APHCRI) a university based research body which is supported by the Australian Government Department of Health and Ageing. Consequently, the research was particularly focussed on ensuring that the findings are relevant and helpful to policy makers.

Project Value: 
$149 987.00
Funding: 
Australian Primary Health Care Research Institute (representing ANU)
Date: 
2011
Time status: 
Complete
Contact: 
Associate Professor Michele Haynes (m.haynes@uq.edu.au)
Aims:
  • The project aimed to address three key research questions in a rigorous and policy relevant manner. The research questions addressed were:
  • How and in what ways does utilization of allied health services differ among patients with chronic disease and what is the relationship to type of health insurance coverage?
  • How and in what ways does utilization of allied health services by patients with chronic disease differ before and after the introduction of the Chronic Disease Management items?
  • For women with chronic disease, how and in what ways does utilization of allied health services change over time with different life stages and what is the relationship to health insurance coverage?
Publications and Reports: 

Foster M, Haynes M, O’Flaherty M, Mitchell G, Skinner E, Haines T (2012) ‘Key Messages, Utilisation of allied health services by people with chronic disease: Differences across health insurance coverage and policy change’,  Australian National University and The University Of Queensland.

Foster M, Haynes M, O’Flaherty M, Mitchell G, Skinner E, Haines T (2012) ‘Policy Options, Utilisation of allied health services by people with chronic disease: Differences across health insurance coverage and policy change’,  Australian National University and The University Of Queensland.

Foster M, Haynes M, O’Flaherty M, Mitchell G, Skinner E, Haines T (2012) ‘Final Report, Utilisation of allied health services by people with chronic disease: Differences across health insurance coverage and policy change’,  Australian National University and The University Of Queensland.

Type: 
Quantitative
Meta-Analysis
Systematic Reviews
Number: 
ISSR060001