Aims:
  • This project aims to build a model of Aboriginal house crowding, then test and refine it for non-remote areas, generating useful findings for housing policy.

Overcrowding for Indigenous Households in Non-Remote Areas

Our research aim is to build an Aboriginal model of crowding and then to test its veracity and application to Aboriginal crowding in non-remote settings, and in so doing uncover salient dimensions and properties of Aboriginal crowding. It is expected these findings may inform and refine definitions of Aboriginal crowding for policy applications across all Australian jurisdictions as well as have impact on international jurisdictions with substantial Indigenous populations (e.g. Canada and New Zealand). The research findings will also have implications for government policies on Indigenous health, housing management and appropriate house design.

Project Value: 
$238 491.00
Funding: 
AHURI
Date: 
2010 to 2012
Time status: 
Complete
Contact: 
Professor Paul Memmott (p.memmott@uq.edu.au)
Aims:
  • This project aims to build a model of Aboriginal house crowding, then test and refine it for non-remote areas, generating useful findings for housing policy.
Publications and Reports: 

Memmott, P., Birdsall-Jones, C. & Greenop, K. (2012) Australian Indigenous Overcrowding, AHURI Final Report No. 194. Melbourne: Australian Housing and Urban Research Institute.

Type: 
Qualitative
Keywords: 
Housing
Indigenous equity
Policy analysis
Number: 
ISSR020072