Aims:
  • Examine the extent to which tenure changes and residential mobility are triggered by fertility outcomes such as the birth of (another) child or a child reaching primary or secondary school age
  • Examine the extent to which the relationship between housing and fertility varies between areas and cohorts, for example, due to spatial and temporal variation in house prices
  • Comparing the housing-fertility relationship in Britain and Australia
  • Improve previous analyses that have ignored common features of panel data, such as attrition and left-censoring, and selection on omitted variables affecting both housing and fertility decisions
  • Inform policy on the housing needs of families, as well as the methods used in longitudinal and comparative research more generally

Housing Transitions and Fertility

Housing transitions - such as changes in housing tenure and residential mobility - are the outcomes of complex history of other life-course events such as union formation and dissolution, birth of children, and changes in employment.

Research on the effect of family events on housing changes is of particular importance because it provides valuable information on when and where families move, and identities changing priorities for the provision of housing assistance and policy.

This project also considers the effects of household structure (e.g. comparing lone parents and couples with children) and the extent to which couples move in anticipation of childbearing, particularly during pregnancy.

Project Value: 
$9 897.00
Funding: 
Economic and Social Research Council
Date: 
2010 to 2013
Time status: 
Complete
Contact: 
Associate Professor Michele Haynes (m.haynes@uq.edu.au )
Aims:
  • Examine the extent to which tenure changes and residential mobility are triggered by fertility outcomes such as the birth of (another) child or a child reaching primary or secondary school age
  • Examine the extent to which the relationship between housing and fertility varies between areas and cohorts, for example, due to spatial and temporal variation in house prices
  • Comparing the housing-fertility relationship in Britain and Australia
  • Improve previous analyses that have ignored common features of panel data, such as attrition and left-censoring, and selection on omitted variables affecting both housing and fertility decisions
  • Inform policy on the housing needs of families, as well as the methods used in longitudinal and comparative research more generally
Type: 
Quantitative
Multi-level Modeling
Longitudinal Outcomes
Multi-process
Lifecourse
Keywords: 
Life course
Housing
Families
Number: 
ISSR060057