Aims:
  • Distil the characteristics of frontline adaptive practice, including the conditions suited to its success, its scalability, and its potential to overcome accountability and legitimacy problems.
  • Design and trial accountability and risk management frameworks that can be flexibly wrapped around frontline adaptive practice and achieve both downward and upward accountability requirements.
  • Develop tools, guidelines, skills and support networks to build the capabilities of participants and frontline workers to cyclically learn and incrementally solve problems of program implementation.

Frontline Adaptive Practice in Complex Indigenous Contexts

This research project aims to develop a sound evidence base and a pragmatic understanding of the realities of policy implementation on the ground in Indigenous Affairs.

It aims to better understand how frontline workers (volunteers and employees of Indigenous organisations, NGOs, private consultants and companies and government agencies) incrementally adapt and learn through the complexity involved in the interests of developing governance and accountability frameworks which better reflect the complex realities of practice in this sector.

In tackling complex development settings internationally, researchers have called for heightened attention to adaptive approaches, with flexible, incremental and cyclic processes that permit continual improvement.

Drawing on this international literature, the project proposes the concept of frontline adaptive practice to describe a modality which takes the current ad hoc standard of ‘muddling through’ to a more proactive process of adaptation.

Funding: 
UQ Collaboration and Industry Engagement Fund - Seed Research Grant
Partners: 
Cape York Institute for Policy and Leadership, Murdi Paaki Regional Enterprise Corporation, Myuma Group, Lend Lease, World Vision Australia
Date: 
2014
Time status: 
Current
Contact: 
Professor Mark Moran (mark.moran@uq.edu.au )
Aims:
  • Distil the characteristics of frontline adaptive practice, including the conditions suited to its success, its scalability, and its potential to overcome accountability and legitimacy problems.
  • Design and trial accountability and risk management frameworks that can be flexibly wrapped around frontline adaptive practice and achieve both downward and upward accountability requirements.
  • Develop tools, guidelines, skills and support networks to build the capabilities of participants and frontline workers to cyclically learn and incrementally solve problems of program implementation.
Type: 
Qualitative
Systematic Reviews
Case Studies
Keywords: 
Policy analysis
Resilience
Disadvantage
Indigenous equity
Number: 
ISSR020707