Aims:
  • The project aims to:
  • Evaluate drug law enforcement Reponses under experimental conditions
  • Contribute in meaningful ways to other DPMP projects by providing, where possible, pertinent law enforcement data
  • Create capacity particularly in Australian law enforcement for improving police performance in reducing drug problems
  • Examine law enforcement-led partnership with third parties (including retail pharmacies)
  • Conduct a review of existing drug law enforcement policies and procedures to identify current legal provisions that support law enforcement efforts (e.g. mandatory reporting of pseudoephedrine sales)
  • Understand the nature and characteristics of ‘other’ partnerships (ie. other than pharmacies) that have been formed to combat the methamphetamine problem
  • Evaluate the impact of drug law enforcement partnerships on patterns of drug use, drug-related crime (within Queensland and Victoria) and drug treatment outcome trends
  • Explore the diffusion and displacement of crime, and the positive (and negative) side effects of police partnerships with third parties.
  • Project objective: Conduct research project that examines drug law enforcement at the federal level
Outcomes:
  • Results show a notable and significant impact of the rollout of Project STOP on drug offence data relating to possesion and trafficking (and supply).
  • There was a delay of approximately one year before possession and trafficking offences dramatically reduced.
  • For possession offences, the effect lasted just over three years before production offences began to increase.
  • The downturn in trafficking offences was most striking for an acute period of four months but a weak monotonic decrease in trafficking is still observed after this time.

DPMP Drug Policy Modelling Program

This project measures the impact of a drug law enforcement initiative, Project STOP, with respect to its impact on suppressing the supply of amphetamines across Queensland and Victoria. Project STOP is a supply side drug law enforcement intervention aimed at disrupting the availability of amphetamines in Queensland and Victoria, thereby increasing the costs and risks associated with manufacturing the drug.This project measures the impact of a drug law enforcement initiative, Project STOP, with respect to its impact on suppressing the supply of amphetamines across Queensland and Victoria. Project STOP is a supply side drug law enforcement intervention aimed at disrupting the availability of amphetamines in Queensland and Victoria, thereby increasing the costs and risks associated with manufacturing the drug.

Funded by the Drug Policy Modelling Program (DPMP). DPMP is led by the University of New South Wales and funded by Colonial Foundation Trust Ltd, a philanthropic foundation. Project STOP was initially launched in Queensland in November 2005 and aimed to reduce the diversion of pseudoephedrine-based products into illicit drug manufacture by, firstly, enhancing pharmacists’ ability to identify suspicious requests for pseudoephedrine products and determine whether customers are legitimate or illegitimate users; and, secondly, by providing intelligence to police and health agencies regarding illicit activities by ‘pseudo runners’ and ‘rogue’ pharmacies. Because data is immediately made available to other pharmacists as well as regulatory agencies and police, it can be used for surveillance and tracking purposes. The data can be readily manipulated to identify hotspots of sales activity, identify customers engaged in repeat purchases and identify pharmacies engaged in suspicious quantities or patterns of sales. In addition, mapping functions attached to the database can produce reports in a format readily usable for investigation and follow-up.

Project Value: 
$300 000.00
Funding: 
Colonial Foundation Trust
National Drug Law Enforcement Research Fund
Partners: 
Griffith University; Texas State University; University of New South Wales; Latrobe University; UTAS; ANU
Date: 
2009 to 2013
Time status: 
Current
Contact: 
Professor Lorraine Mazerolle (l.mazerolle@uq.edu.au)
Aims:
  • The project aims to:
  • Evaluate drug law enforcement Reponses under experimental conditions
  • Contribute in meaningful ways to other DPMP projects by providing, where possible, pertinent law enforcement data
  • Create capacity particularly in Australian law enforcement for improving police performance in reducing drug problems
  • Examine law enforcement-led partnership with third parties (including retail pharmacies)
  • Conduct a review of existing drug law enforcement policies and procedures to identify current legal provisions that support law enforcement efforts (e.g. mandatory reporting of pseudoephedrine sales)
  • Understand the nature and characteristics of ‘other’ partnerships (ie. other than pharmacies) that have been formed to combat the methamphetamine problem
  • Evaluate the impact of drug law enforcement partnerships on patterns of drug use, drug-related crime (within Queensland and Victoria) and drug treatment outcome trends
  • Explore the diffusion and displacement of crime, and the positive (and negative) side effects of police partnerships with third parties.
  • Project objective: Conduct research project that examines drug law enforcement at the federal level
Outcomes:
  • Results show a notable and significant impact of the rollout of Project STOP on drug offence data relating to possesion and trafficking (and supply).
  • There was a delay of approximately one year before possession and trafficking offences dramatically reduced.
  • For possession offences, the effect lasted just over three years before production offences began to increase.
  • The downturn in trafficking offences was most striking for an acute period of four months but a weak monotonic decrease in trafficking is still observed after this time.
Cluster: 
Program/Affiliation: 
Type: 
Quantitative
Keywords: 
Resilience
Crime control
Policy evaluation
Number: 
ISSR030045