Aims:
  • What type of collective social risk protection is offered by the welfare state in Germany, Sweden and Australia?
  • Is there an interplay between the welfare state and industrial relations in these countries? If so, what does this look like?
  • Which collective bargaining instruments (such as bonuses, wage supplements, leave options, training opportunities, reintegration opportunities) are used by industrial relations actors?
  • What lessons are can be learned (for the Netherlands) from this international comparison?

Collective Agreements & Social Security in Comparative Perspective

The current research focuses on an extension of recent studies (e.g. Trampusch 2006, Yerkes 2011) into the role of industrial relations actors in welfare state policy by looking at the interplay of social security policy and industrial relations in comparative context. The study takes the Dutch case as a starting point (Yerkes 2011), where there is a strong interplay between the welfare state and industrial relations, and focuses on examining this interplay in comparative perspective. Three countries with a strong industrial relations presence but varying welfare state contexts are analysed: Germany, Sweden and Australia. Using a qualitative analytic sociological approach, the study compares collective social risk protection for unemployment and parental leave within this interplay between welfare states and industrial relations, with special attention for collective (enterprise) bargaining. While this interplay is highly institutionalized in the Netherlands (Yerkes 2011), this interplay is dissimilar across countries.

Project Value: 
$69 439.00
Funding: 
Dutch Gak Foundation
Partners: 
Dutch Gak Foundation
Date: 
2011 to 2013
Time status: 
Current
Contact: 
Dr Mara Yerkes (m.yerkes@uq.edu.au)
Aims:
  • What type of collective social risk protection is offered by the welfare state in Germany, Sweden and Australia?
  • Is there an interplay between the welfare state and industrial relations in these countries? If so, what does this look like?
  • Which collective bargaining instruments (such as bonuses, wage supplements, leave options, training opportunities, reintegration opportunities) are used by industrial relations actors?
  • What lessons are can be learned (for the Netherlands) from this international comparison?
Program/Affiliation: 
Type: 
Qualitative
Comparative case study
Keywords: 
Labour market
Policy analysis
Employment
Number: 
ISSR010225