Aims:
  • The project will be the first to examine the key community processes and structures associated with community resilience before and after a disaster using the first three waves of ACCS in Brisbane to benchmark changes in the post-flood environment.
  • It will provide critical insights into the rebuilding and recovery of affected suburbs and present a comparative evidence base to researchers and policy makers to assist in preparing for inevitable future disasters in Australia and elsewhere.
  • Our research will also identify the various pathways and mechanisms leading not only to particular vulnerabilities, like inter-group violence, but those that lead to converging vulnerabilities.
  • Additionally, this project will provide a framework from which to progress future research for other marginalised groups such as young people, Indigenous people and gays and lesbians across urban and non-urban settings.
  • This research will form the foundation of a long term research project that will progress a comprehensive longitudinal study into the ecology of crime in the Australian context.
  • The ACCS research project has three broad expected outcomes:
  • to enhance our theoretical and empirical understanding of the spatial and temporal variation in crime, disorder, inter-group conflict and community resilience;
  • to generate and integrate new methodologies, databases and maps of social problems; and
  • to provide sound theoretical and empirical data on which to develop evidence based intervention approaches, particularly into at-risk, vulnerable communities.

Australian Community Capacity Study

Police responses to violent incidents, disorder and ethnically motivated disputes continue to challenge and drain police resources. In the post 9/11 era new types of public safety emergencies, coupled with a range of contemporary ethnic, religious, cultural and ideological issues, create new challenges for the police and raise public concern about the growing social isolation and marginalisation of particular groups. This project seeks to better understand the spatial and temporal dynamics of communities vulnerable to growing levels crime, disorder, inter-group violence and inter-group hostility.

The Australian Community Capacity Study (ACCS) is one of the world’s best longitudinal studies of place. ACCS uses urban criminological theories to better understand the spatial and temporal dynamics of community resilience, crime, disorder, and inter-group violence.

At present, the ACCS comprises three waves of survey data across 148 suburbs in Brisbane and one wave of survey data across 150 suburbs in Melbourne. Dr. Rebecca Wickes and her UQ-based team will conduct a fourth wave survey across the 148 Brisbane suburbs during 2012 (see below).

During 2011 the ACCS research team oversaw the completion of the first Melbourne wave and third Brisbane wave of over 9,000 Computer Assisted Telephone Interviews (CATI) as well as in-depth face-to-face interviews with a “booster sample” of nearly 1,000 people from culturally and linguistically diverse migrant groups. These CATI survey and face-to-face data were cleaned, geocoded and analysed during 2011 and researchers also procured Census data from the Australian Bureau of Statistics and crime incident data from the Queensland and Victorian Police Services. Researchers finalised a major technical report and began initial analyses of the data.

In 2012, Dr. Wickes and her UQ research team (Drs Lynda Cheshire, Peter Waters and Jonathan Corcoran) administered a fourth wave of the ACCS survey with a focus on community resilience in Brisbane suburbs during the aftermath of the 2011 flood disaster. In Australia (and internationally) understanding and enhancing community resilience is a high priority as people increasingly face significant environmental and national security challenges.

For more information, please see http://www.uq.edu.au/accs/

Project Value: 
$5 500 000.00
Partners: 
Queensland Police Service
Date: 
2008
Time status: 
Current
Contact: 
Dr Rebecca Wickes (r.wickes@uq.edu.au)
Aims:
  • The project will be the first to examine the key community processes and structures associated with community resilience before and after a disaster using the first three waves of ACCS in Brisbane to benchmark changes in the post-flood environment.
  • It will provide critical insights into the rebuilding and recovery of affected suburbs and present a comparative evidence base to researchers and policy makers to assist in preparing for inevitable future disasters in Australia and elsewhere.
  • Our research will also identify the various pathways and mechanisms leading not only to particular vulnerabilities, like inter-group violence, but those that lead to converging vulnerabilities.
  • Additionally, this project will provide a framework from which to progress future research for other marginalised groups such as young people, Indigenous people and gays and lesbians across urban and non-urban settings.
  • This research will form the foundation of a long term research project that will progress a comprehensive longitudinal study into the ecology of crime in the Australian context.
  • The ACCS research project has three broad expected outcomes:
  • to enhance our theoretical and empirical understanding of the spatial and temporal variation in crime, disorder, inter-group conflict and community resilience;
  • to generate and integrate new methodologies, databases and maps of social problems; and
  • to provide sound theoretical and empirical data on which to develop evidence based intervention approaches, particularly into at-risk, vulnerable communities.
Program/Affiliation: 
Type: 
Quantitative
Multi-level Modeling
Keywords: 
Resilience
Crime control
Number: 
ISSR030040